SANFORD BIGGERS | CHORUS FOR PAUL MOONEY | MARIANNE BOESKY

 

Sanford Biggers has a new show up at Marianne Boesky, and while you won’t find paintings replete with nude models like you will with Celeste-Dupuy Spencer or Philip Pearlstein right now, there remains some common ground.

 

He we see not a representation of textiles but rather the deployment of actual textiles. Works like this one, Chorus for Paul Mooney, make use of antique quilts and other fabrics. Biggers is a great colorist, and I love the contrasting patterns and hues that really make Chorus pop. The layering at play here does give the work some space, as if Biggers were constucting an environment on canvas. We feel those day-glo zags resting above the azure blue, which rests above the gold paint, which rests above the “ground” of patchy quiltwork. So space, I’d say, is a real concern here, only Biggers makes it all about the fabric, rather than make the fabric one of many elements. And yet this work is also a portrait of sorts, or at least a chorus in honor of Paul Mooney, the acclaimed comedian and critic.

 

Other works like Ooo Oui, besides having a Hammons-like or Duchampian sense of punning, ratchet up Bigger’s interest in textile-as-space. A geometric pattern is replicated here that we all recognize–a tesselation that seems to flicker between inversion and explosion, where a cubic forms dances back and forth.

 

At Marianne Boesky, this seems to reach its logical conclusion with Fool’s Puzzle, where Biggers takes his fabric geometries and literally maps them onto a three dimensional field, which creates actual arrises, actual hollows, actual depths of field. It’s not surprising to see that Biggers has also wrapped actual sculptures in these fabrics, as if dressing wounds. Space, it seems, and the textile, appear intimately related throughout the show.

 

Four on the Floor #3

Philip Pearlstein | Celeste Dupuy-Spencer | Sanford Biggers | Alighiero Boetti

Sanford Biggers, Chorus for Paul Mooney, Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery

Sanford Biggers, Undertow, 2017. Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery.

Sanford Biggers, Ooo Oui, 2017. Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery.

Sanford Biggers, Fool’s Puzzle, 2017. Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery.

Sanford Biggers, Chorus for Paul Mooney, 

SANFORD BIGGERS | CHORUS FOR PAUL MOONEY | MARIANNE BOESKY

 

Sanford Biggers has a new show up at Marianne Boesky, and while you won’t find paintings replete with nude models like you will with Celeste-Dupuy Spencer or Philip Pearlstein right now, there remains some common ground.

Sanford Biggers, Undertow, 2017. Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery.

He we see not a representation of textiles but rather the deployment of actual textiles. Works like this one, Chorus for Paul Mooney, make use of antique quilts and other fabrics. Biggers is a great colorist, and I love the contrasting patterns and hues that really make Chorus pop. The layering at play here does give the work some space, as if Biggers were constucting an environment on canvas. We feel those day-glo zags resting above the azure blue, which rests above the gold paint, which rests above the “ground” of patchy quiltwork. So space, I’d say, is a real concern here, only Biggers makes it all about the fabric, rather than make the fabric one of many elements. And yet this work is also a portrait of sorts, or at least a chorus in honor of Paul Mooney, the acclaimed comedian and critic.

Other works like Ooo Oui, besides having a Hammons-like or Duchampian sense of punning, ratchet up Bigger’s interest in textile-as-space. A geometric pattern is replicated here that we all recognize–a tesselation that seems to flicker between inversion and explosion, where a cubic forms dances back and forth.

 

Sanford Biggers, Ooo Oui, 2017. Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery.

At Marianne Boesky, this seems to reach its logical conclusion with Fool’s Puzzle, where Biggers takes his fabric geometries and literally maps them onto a three dimensional field, which creates actual arrises, actual hollows, actual depths of field. It’s not surprising to see that Biggers has also wrapped actual sculptures in these fabrics, as if dressing wounds. Space, it seems, and the textile, appear intimately related throughout the show.

Sanford Biggers, Fool’s Puzzle, 2017. Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery.

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and we'll send you the next issue of Four On The Floor. It's a great way to discover lesser known artists, and to keep pace with the city's art-world. It's also totally free, a lot of fun, and you can opt-out at any time.

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and we'll send you the next issue of Four On The Floor. It's a great way to discover lesser known artists, and to keep pace with the city's art-world. It's also totally free, a lot of fun, and you can opt-out at any time.

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