ALIGHIERO BOETTI | TUTTO | HAUSER & WIRTH

Everybody and their best friend went to see Kara Walker’s new show at Sikkema Jenkins. A lot of those people made it next door, to Hauser & Wirth’s pseudo-temporary space, where they’ve staged a massive, three floor Arte Povera exhibition. Included are many works by Alighiero Boetti, who carved out a niche using embroidery and sewing. If the Pearlstein and the Dupuy-Spencer form one pendant, than the Biggers and the Boetti form another.

Boetti’s maps are perhaps his most well-known works, but I found myself drawn instead to another piece, Tutto, or Everything, which appeared on the opposite wall. Here, snatches of fabric and stitching have been woven together into an all-over composition. In the fragment provided, one can see the outline of a vase, a key, anamorphic figures, and the silhouttes of children. 

One can’t help but think of Boetti’s interest in cartography, and particularly in the way that national boundaries lie tangent to one another so that no space remains unaccounted for. But if Biggers’ textiles work to create a physical space, these work to map a conceptual one. In that way, Tutto affirms its flatness, and it resolves into abstraction. Formally, its like the strange love child of Anni Albers and Jackson Pollock. Of course, the politics of Arte Povera were something very different.

 

In any case, we find with Alighieri another artist who has found a way to grapple with space through a material that typically takes up very little: fabric, or the textile. And so, throughout issue #3 we find an array of those strategies, from their depiction to their implementation, where they help an artwork spring into our realm, or collapse into its own.

Four on the Floor #3

Philip Pearlstein | Celeste Dupuy-Spencer | Sanford Biggers | Alighiero Boetti

Alighiero Boetti, Tutto, c.1980. Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth.

Alighiero Boetti, Tutto, 1994. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Alighiero Boetti, Map, 1989-94. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Alighiero Boetti, Alternating One to a Hundred and Vice Versa, 1993. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Alighiero Boetti, Tutto, c.1980. Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth.

ALIGHIERO BOETTI | TUTTO | HAUSER & WIRTH

 

Everybody and their best friend went to see Kara Walker’s new show at Sikkema Jenkins. A lot of those people made it next door, to Hauser & Wirth’s pseudo-temporary space, where they’ve staged a massive, three floor Arte Povera exhibition. Included are many works by Alighiero Boetti, who carved out a niche using embroidery and sewing. If the Pearlstein and the Dupuy-Spencer form one pendant, than the Biggers and the Boetti form another.

Alighiero Boetti, Tutto, 1994. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Boetti’s maps are perhaps his most well-known works, but I found myself drawn instead to another piece, Tutto, or Everything, which appeared on the opposite wall. Here, snatches of fabric and stitching have been woven together into an all-over composition. In the fragment provided, one can see the outline of a vase, a key, anamorphic figures, and the silhouttes of children. 

One can’t help but think of Boetti’s interest in cartography, and particularly in the way that national boundaries lie tangent to one another so that no space remains unaccounted for. But if Biggers’ textiles work to create a physical space, these work to map a conceptual one. In that way, Tutto affirms its flatness, and it resolves into abstraction. Formally, its like the strange love child of Anni Albers and Jackson Pollock. Of course, the politics of Arte Povera were something very different.

Alighiero Boetti, Map, 1989-94. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

In any case, we find with Alighieri another artist who has found a way to grapple with space through a material that typically takes up very little: fabric, or the textile. And so, throughout issue #3 we find an array of those strategies, from their depiction to their implementation, where they help an artwork spring into our realm, or collapse into its own.

Four on the Floor #3

Philip Pearlstein | Celeste Dupuy-Spencer | Sanford Biggers | Alighiero Boetti

Alighiero Boetti, Alternating One to a Hundred and Vice Versa, 1993. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

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and we'll send you the next issue of Four On The Floor. It's a great way to discover lesser known artists, and to keep pace with the city's art-world. It's also totally free, a lot of fun, and you can opt-out at any time.

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and we'll send you the next issue of Four On The Floor. It's a great way to discover lesser known artists, and to keep pace with the city's art-world. It's also totally free, a lot of fun, and you can opt-out at any time.

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