JAIMIE WARREN | ONE SWEET DAY | THE HOLE

Jaimie Warren’s new work, a complex installation/video project/performance piece called One Sweet Day, probes the depths of camp and culture. One might even say that there’s something penetrating about this project, which manages to braid a somber, renaissance masterpiece with 80s sitcoms and Michael Jackson.

Art historical references and cultural quotations abound at The Hole NYC right now, where Warren’s recent work is on full, hi-fi display. Included are five videos, the largest and most complex being One Sweet Day. Near the door we see Warren re-enacting George Harrison’s music video for Set on You transposed onto an Egyptian frieze-like stage. The now-bearded artist channels the Beatle as she saunters and plays to the camera with total aplomb.

Other works show Warren’s interest in art history, and in particular the renaissance, like her I Just Called to Say I Love You: Self-Portrait as Stevie Wonder in re-creation of Primavera by Sandro Botticelli (1482): a rollicking re-enactment of the famous de Medici commission. As the press release states, Warren made these works over various residencies, and in conjunction with the local community, especially children. Her Botticelli is no exception, and we see children playfully fulfilling various roles as they reinvent à la tableaux vivant, the Florentine masterpiece.

I think this shouldn’t be downplayed. Warren seems to have an interest in both community engagement and child education, especially art education, and frankly I support any smart artworks that support those goals. Education departments are often the smallest at art museums, and yet I’d say they’re the most important. Certainly much of the playfulness, and richness, of Warren’s videos emerges from this bilateral approach, where she teaches children, and children teach her.

Warren seems particularly interested in the quattrocento renaissance, for it recurs in her newest work, One Sweet Day. Importantly, we’ve abandoned the secular work of Botticelli for the religious work of Fra Angelico. More than a video, the viewer first enters a built environment, a cave, where we find a screen. Here we watch four children go on an adventure through their own tunnel complex, discovering Fra Angelico’s Scene from the Thebaid (c.1430). as a cave-painting. The sensibility here is Punky Brewster meets The Goonies, but this shifts as we exit the cave and enter into Fra Angelico’s very landscape. Snippets of more video work appear here, which will be the site of the artist’s August 17th performance.

But the mashup here of camp, child-play, and Fra Angelico produces a strange vibration that even the Botticelli doesn’t. The 15th century monk’s works were nothing like his later contemporary’s, which were all about movement and action, characterized by his wispy, flowy forms. Fra Angelico made devotional imagery, and his works have taken on a universal appeal precisely because they are so sparse, somber, and plain. It makes Warren’s practice then all the more compelling to see such work take on a surreal aliveness. The cave, in this way, also seems crucial: it provides a liminal space, a mid-way point to help us ease our way from the real to the surreal, the somber to the spectacular. And in plumbing the depths of the earth (as in spelunking) Warren reiterates her plumbing of art historical content. I’m looking forward to the site’s fullest activation when the artist performs on August 17th.

 

Four on the Floor #2

Jaimie Warren | Megan Marrin | Ray Johnson | Arghavan Khosravi

Jaimie Warren, One Sweet Day, 2017. Courtesy of the Artist.

Jaimie WarrenSet on You, c. 2016. Courtesy of the Artist.

Fra Angelico, Scene from the Thebaid, c.1430.

Jaimie WarrenOne Fine Day, 2017. Courtesy of the Artist.

Jaimie WarrenOne Fine Day, 2017. Courtesy of the Artist.

Jaimie Warren, One Fine Day, 2017. Courtesy of the Artist.

JAIMIE WARREN | ONE SWEET DAY | THE HOLE

Jaimie Warren’s new work, a complex installation/video project/performance piece called One Sweet Day, probes the depths of camp and culture. One might even say that there’s something penetrating about this project, which manages to braid a somber, renaissance masterpiece with 80s sitcoms and Michael Jackson.

Art historical references and cultural quotations abound at The Hole NYC right now, where Warren’s recent work is on full, hi-fi display. Included are five videos, the largest and most complex being One Fine Day. Near the door we see Warren re-enacting George Harrison’s music video for Set on You transposed onto an Egyptian frieze-like stage. The now-bearded artist channels the Beatle as she saunters and plays to the camera with total aplomb.

Jaimie WarrenSet on You, c. 2016. Courtesy of the Artist.

Other works show Warren’s interest in art history, and in particular the renaissance, like her I Just Called to Say I Love You: Self-Portrait as Stevie Wonder in re-creation of Primavera by Sandro Botticelli (1482): a rollicking re-enactment of the famous de Medici commission. As the press release states, Warren made these works over various residencies, and in conjunction with the local community, especially children. Her Botticelli is no exception, and we see children playfully fulfilling various roles as they reinvent à la tableaux vivant, the Florentine masterpiece.

I think this shouldn’t be downplayed. Warren seems to have an interest in both community engagement and child education, especially art education, and frankly I support any smart artworks that support those goals. Education departments are often the smallest at art museums, and yet I’d say they’re the most important. Certainly much of the playfulness, and richness, of Warren’s videos emerges from this bilateral approach, where she teaches children, and children teach her.

Fra Angelico, Scene from the Thebaid, c.1430.

Warren seems particularly interested in the quattrocento renaissance, for it recurs in her newest work, One Fine Day. Importantly, we’ve abandoned the secular work of Botticelli for the religious work of Fra Angelico. More than a video, the viewer first enters a built environment, a cave, where we find a screen. Here we watch four children go on an adventure through their own tunnel complex, discovering Fra Angelico’s Scene from the Thebaid (c.1430). as a cave-painting. The sensibility here is Punky Brewster meets The Goonies, but this shifts as we exit the cave and enter into Fra Angelico’s very landscape. Snippets of more video work appear here, which will be the site of the artist’s August 17th performance.

But the mashup here of camp, child-play, and Fra Angelico produces a strange vibration that even the Botticelli doesn’t. The 15th century monk’s works were nothing like his later contemporary’s, which were all about movement and action, characterized by his wispy, flowy forms. Fra Angelico made devotional imagery, and his works have taken on a universal appeal precisely because they are so sparse, somber, and plain. It makes Warren’s practice then all the more compelling to see such work take on a surreal aliveness. The cave, in this way, also seems crucial: it provides a liminal space, a mid-way point to help us ease our way from the real to the surreal, the somber to the spectacular. And in plumbing the depths of the earth (as in spelunking) Warren reiterates her plumbing of art historical content. I’m looking forward to the site’s fullest activation when the artist performs on August 17th.

Jaimie WarrenOne Fine Day, 2017. Courtesy of the Artist.

Jaimie WarrenOne Fine Day, 2017. Courtesy of the Artist.

Four on the Floor #2

Jaimie Warren | Megan Marrin | Ray Johnson | Arghavan Khosravi

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and we'll send you the next issue of Four On The Floor. It's a great way to discover lesser known artists, and to keep pace with the city's art-world. It's also totally free, a lot of fun, and you can opt-out at any time.

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